Tag: Trinidad and Tobago

Check constructmaterials for Trinidad and Tobago in 1998.

Caribbean Travel

Caribbean Travel

Travel to Bonaire

Travel to Bonaire

Bonaire – The diving paradise with an adventure profile! The Dutch Caribbean island of Bonaire is known as the divers’ paradise. The island has relatively few beaches but is perfect for you who are looking for an active and close to nature holiday. Here also rests a calm and welcoming atmosphere. If you want to experience diving and snorkeling, Bonaire is a given alternative. Here you will also find a wide range of other outdoor activities such as cycling adventures, horse riding, kayaking and windsurfing. For longer excursions on the island you usually need a rental car.

Travel to Barbados

Travel to Barbados

For many people, Barbados has always been the epitome of a Caribbean island paradise. Here you will find fantastic beaches and the friendliest people imaginable. The nature is magnificent and along the coast you will find not only beautiful beaches but also dramatic rock formations and wonderful coves. Barbados has many faces and is a complete destination for those who love exciting nature experiences, but the island is also an excellent destination for those who may just want to take it easy in the shade of a palm tree. In Barbados there is really something for everyone – for those who like nightlife and Caribbean tones, the bar and restaurant life is well developed and for those who like to move around, there is a large selection of water sports activities. If you want to see a little more of the local life on the island, it is also perfectly possible to use the local buses.

For those interested in nature, the stalactite cave Harrison Cave with waterfalls and underground lakes is well worth a visit. Those interested in food and drink can take advantage of the Mount Gay rum distillery, which produces what many consider to be one of the world’s best rums. Those who love water sports can, for example, visit Silver Sands Beach on the south coast, which is windsurfers’ favorite beach. There is so much to do in Barbados! Those who want a little variety from beach life can also visit the capital Bridgetown, which is not bigger than you have time to explore it during a day trip.

As one of Caribbean countries defined by Countryaah, Barbados was once a British colony but is today an independent island state. However, some British phenomena such as cricket, horse racing and afternoon tea are still very popular, which gives the island’s cultural life a special charm. Barbados has a rich history, wonderful nature, well-developed service and a welcoming atmosphere – all the ingredients that make for a successful holiday!

Travel to Aruba

Travel to Aruba

With its palm-lined white beaches, turquoise waters and gentle sea breezes, Aruba is a dream destination for many Swedes. Here you will find a place in the sun with sparkling beaches and crystal clear water – Aruba really lives up to its reputation as a Caribbean paradise. It is sunny all year round and the water rarely gets colder than 25 degrees. Hurricanes and thunderstorms are uncommon and precipitation is low. Anyone who longs for sun, swimming and heat can travel here at any time during the year.

Arubas has a rather varied history and possesses a diversity that is reflected in the local cuisine, architecture and the warm, friendly population. The island’s first inhabitants belonged to the Arawaki tribe from the South American mainland, but over the centuries, people from different parts of the world have come to populate Aruba, as well as elsewhere in the Caribbean archipelago. Before the Dutch takeover in the 1630s, the island belonged to Spain. In the early 19th century, Aruba was also occasionally occupied by Britain. However, the official language of the island is Dutch because the island still belongs to the Netherlands, even though Aruba today has a far-reaching independence.

Aruba’s flag shows a white-edged red four-pointed star against a blue background with two horizontal yellow stripes at the bottom. The red star symbolizes the island itself surrounded by blue water. The yellow ribbons symbolize abundance, the red color of the star represents love and its white edges the chalk-white beaches that surround the island. Love lined with white beaches in a turquoise sea – it’s Aruba.

Travel to Antigua

Travel to Antigua

The Caribbean island of Antigua is known for its beautiful white beaches and turquoise waters. There are 365 beaches and during your holiday you will surely find your own favorite. Antigua, with its long white beaches and crystal clear waters, is a favorite destination for honeymooners. The island is truly something of a “tropical paradise” and the beaches lack the crowds you often find on the Mediterranean. Antigua is also suitable for families with children and there is plenty to do on the island – in addition to relaxing on one of the divinely beautiful beaches. Why not try kitesurfing, jet skiing, snorkeling, deep sea fishing or canoeing? You can also rent a car and discover the island on your own. Antigua is also an exciting island for the historically interested. In the surroundings of English Harbor on the southern part of the island you will find, for example, Nelson ‘ s Dockyard which was an English naval shipyard in the 18th century. Nelson’s Dockyard is located in a national park that also includes the Shirley Heights cliff from which you get a completely wonderful view of the surroundings. The British influence is evident on the island and villages and bays bear names reminiscent of Britain. About half of the island’s 60,000 inhabitants live in the pleasant capital St Johns, which is a fairly small town that is also well suited for exploring on foot. There are many boutiques and wine bars where you can slip in for a glass. By the harbor is the popular Redcliffe Quay with its cozy restaurants, small shops and bars. At the end of Market Street you will find the lively and colorful market filled with exotic fruits, vegetables and fresh fish.

Travel to Anguilla

Travel to Anguilla

The Caribbean island of Anguilla is a true paradise island for anyone seeking peace and quiet in the beautiful Caribbean archipelago. Here you will find chalk-white beaches and small cozy restaurants that, among other things, serve the island’s main delicacy – lobster. Here you can take the day as it comes and enjoy the gentle breeze from the sea. In addition to its pristine beaches and stunning coral reefs, Anguilla is also known for its relaxed and hospitable population. Anguilla is one of the least exploited islands in the Caribbean and hotels and restaurants maintain a very high standard. Therefore, a stay in Anguilla makes for a wonderful experience.

Anguilla is just a 20-minute boat ride from the island of St Martin (Sint Maarten), where the region’s international airport is located. From St. Martin, ferries to Anguilla run every half hour for most of the day. The largest city and also the capital of Anguilla is called The Valley. However, this is not a major metropolis. Entertainment and shopping are instead mostly scattered on the island, often adjacent to the beaches and hotels.

Trinidad and Tobago Business

Trinidad and Tobago Business

According to countryaah, Trinidad and Tobago is one of the oldest petroleum producing countries in the world, and revenues from this sector are of great importance to the country’s economy. Petroleum exploration on land started as early as 1902, with production starting a few years later, and in 1955 petroleum was also found at sea. It was previously assumed that oil deposits would end around 2003–05, but new major discoveries of oil and natural gas in the 1990s and 2000s brought new growth. Revenue from the petroleum business has been used to establish other industries, and Trinidad and Tobago have become one of the more industrialized countries in the Caribbean.

  • According to abbreviationfinder, TNT is the 2 letter abbreviation for the country of Trinidad and Tobago.

Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of Trinidad and Tobago

Until recently, Trinidad and Tobago have had the region’s most extensive state-controlled economy. From the beginning of the 1980s, the country experienced financial problems due to falling oil prices and related products. As the economic problems increased, the International Monetary Fund contributed to liberalization of the economy. a large part of the former state-owned enterprises were privatized. From the latter part of the 1990s, the economy showed signs of recovery, but as in so many other countries, this occurred at the expense of the country’s social development, and the proportion of poor people increased.

Agriculture and fisheries have a modest economic scope, and in 2004 the sector contributed only 0.9% of GDP and employed approx. 5% of the working population. In the same year, industry and mining contributed about 50% of GDP and employed approx. 30% of the working population. Service industries have been growing rapidly, and contributed in 2004 with nearly half of GDP and employed close to 2 / 3 of the working population. The tourism industry represents a significant part of this, and is also an important source of foreign currency. Various tourist facilities such as hotels, harbors etc. have been improved to attract more tourists, and the country receives around 400,000 visitors annually. Around 1/3 coming from the US.

In 2005, GDP per household was estimated at USD 12,900.

Agriculture, forestry and fishing

The earth is partly volcanic in origin and very fertile. The cultivation of sugar on large plantations was formerly the main industry in the country, but today sugar accounts for a very small part of export revenue. In 2004, 680,000 tonnes were produced, which is half of the 2002 production. Oranges, cocoa and coffee are also grown for export. Corn, sweet potato, vegetables and rice are also grown, mostly for their own consumption. The livestock team includes pigs, cattle, goats, sheep and chickens; In addition, beekeeping is run with honey production. Trinidad and Tobago were formerly net exporters of food, but now have large food imports.

Some forestry is being run. Of the annual harvest around 90,000 m 3 is 2/3 to the industrial processing (sawn timber, pulp and paper) and the rest of the fuel.

Fishing is of no great economic importance, but is important in the local diet.

Mining, energy

After considerable efforts on oil and gas exploration, new big discoveries were made in the 1990s that gave rise to optimism for the industry. In the mid-2000s, production was 7405 million m 3. Trinidad and Tobago have the world’s largest occurrence of natural asphalt (bitumen) in Pitch Lake. Cement and limestone are also extracted.

Industry

The chemical and petrochemical industries are significant. There are petroleum refineries in Pointe-à-Pierre and Point Fortin with large production and exports of petroleum and petroleum products. Trinidad and Tobago are among the world’s largest producers of liquefied natural gas (LNG) and ammonia. Artificial fertilizers, plastic and glassware, as well as electronic equipment are also produced. Near the capital there are also iron and steel mills and cement industry; in addition, the electronics industry, the textile and clothing industry and the production of food and beverages (juice, sugar, rum etc.).

Foreign Trade

Trinidad and Tobago have a current account surplus abroad. The main export goods are petroleum and petroleum products. In addition, chemicals (ammonia, etc.), textiles and food and beverages are exported; machinery and means of transport are partially re-exported. The country has significant imports of machinery (oil drilling equipment etc.) and transport equipment, as well as industrial finished goods and food products. Trinidad and Tobago have a surplus in the balance of trade abroad. According to Countryaah, the United States is the most important trading country in terms of both exports and imports.

Transport and Communications

The road network is well developed, with approx. 8300 km of public roads. Main ports are Port of Spain, Pointe-à-Pierre and Point Lisas in Trinidad, and Scarborough in Tobago. Piarco International Airport in Trinidad and Crown Point in Tobago.