Bike Uphill Technique

Our site: riding a bike up a hill is almost always a hassle. If the Hill also consists of roots, rocks or loose ground becomes also a technical challenge. We show the way to a better technology.

Technical ascents are difficult to master because they require both technology and strength, and often a great deal of will. Are you tired of the ascent, it is easy to cut corners with the technique, lose focus and fall out of line. When you tackle a hill notwithstanding, it’s about getting up in the most effective and energy-efficient way possible. Your tool is then efficient pedal technique, high cadence and relaxed torso. The same is true of technical ascents, with the big difference that you have to be much more flexible and be able to quickly move the center of gravity on the bike when obstacles arise.

Cyclist: Madeleine Jacobsson, Cykloteket Racing Team

PLAN YOUR ROUTE
Keep your eyes ahead, identify obstacles and plan your route. A little more difficult obstacles early on the slopes could cause you to get a lighter ending. To plan your route also means that you should save the forces until it is really needed. Bring in a little extra when it is difficult to you speed over the obstacle, and take the quieter when the terrain is less demanding.

GLUE YOU TO THE GROUND
You have to have good contact with the ground at all times, with both front and rear wheel. If the rear wheel slips against the surface you lose speed and power that then is expensive to recover. If you feel it begin to drop, move her bottom backwards to put more weight on the rear wheel and thereby get better grip. In order to avoid that it feels like to cycle to raise, it is important to press the front wheel into the ground by keeping your upper body over the handlebars. Be sure to have an even pressure on the pedals to not drop the stronghold. When you stand up, it is easy to pedal technology gets worse, but try to keep in-step tread! Strive for smooth, firm and controlled movements throughout the body rather than the jerky and sudden. It keeps you glued to the ground.

HEAVY LEGS AND EASY UPPER BODY
It is above all the legs and core muscles that do the job, so be sure to relax in the rest of the body. Press and hold light in the handle bars, relax your shoulders and arms, and hold up the body with help of the back and the belly. It makes you more flexible and helps you to accumulate power in the legs.

WHAT GEAR?
An easy switch makes it easier to pedal and you might be bothered anymore, but it can also mean that you lose traction and start to skid. You risk losing momentum and torque over obstacles, and when you must trample to vigorously to take you over and you will get not enough speed. A heavy gear, of course, is heavier to drag around, but it gives you both the higher speed and better fluency. If you can’t be bothered all the way, you can switch to lighter rear during climbing again. You will also need to switch down to a smaller blade forward, you need to sit down and let go after the pressure in the pedals during switching. Remember to plan your roaming based on how the Hill looks like. Perhaps it is best to already be on the little blade when Hill begins?

SIT OR STAND?
When you sit on the saddle it takes less energy than when you stand, so its when you have the opportunity. It also reduces the risk that you lose traction and start to skid with the rear wheel. You may, however, more power, more explosive and more mobile when you stand up. It gives you more speed over obstacles and you have more room to adjust your body position. If the slope is very steep, you may need to set you up in order to maintain an even pressure over the bike’s front and rear wheels so that the front wheel is not inside or you from tipping backwards. Otherwise it is individually if you most like to sit or stand to test what works for you!

MAKE UP YOUR MIND
A severe slope requires a lot of will, and the slightest hesitation can determine whether you will take you up or have to put your foot down. It’s easy to get caught up looking at the obstacles that are directly in front, or an obstacle that is extra difficult. Often the focus is very much on a particular obstacles in the Hill, and after it is completed, the stop. So make up your mind! Get yourself a pair of horns on his forehead and trample on all the way up to the top. Is it not the first time? Go down again and start over until you pass slope.

FIX OBSTACLES AMID THE ASCENT
If the ascent offers technical difficulties, such as a rock ledge, a root, a large rock or other imperfections, it is important that you adjust the body and the force after this. To get over the trappstegsliknande formations, you need to use your body and lift you over the hurdle.Start with a light weight on the front wheel and lift it up over the edge. Then unblock the upper body forward and upward over the obstacle. Take with you the rest of the bike and push it so that the whole cycle will over step. The mount is bad, it is important that you do not trample with force, but gently takes you over the hurdle. It can be a slippery stone, a root or very loose ground. It may also be on the crest of a larger stair treads on the slopes, where you are not yet a review with you the rear wheel and therefore should not be pedaling to than, to avoid slipping. Identify these spots in the Hill and be sure to have with you. Pedal firmly to tread and roll more gently over parties with poor grip. Sometimes you might have to stop completely, but it does not necessarily mean the end of your slope. Find your balance, reload and pedaling on.

HERE’S HOW!

MINITRAPPA OR HEEL
If you have access to a staircase with a maximum of three steps, it is good to practice uppförsteknik i. may well be a bit flat with low steps.

  1. Stand up on the bike and take%

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